1. Home
  2. /
  3. OPHTHALMOLOGY
  4. /
  5. REFRACTIVE PRODUCT RANGE

REFRACTIVE PRODUCT RANGE

Global
Eyecryl Phakic

Eyecryl Phakic

Phakic Aspheric Hydrophilic Acrylic Foldable Intraocular Lens

Eyecryl Phakic TORIC

Hydrophilic Acrylic Foldable Phakic Toric Intraocular Lens With Delivery System

Flavin

Flavin

Isotonic Riboflavin Ophthalmic Solution

Flavin HY

Flavin HY

Hypotonic Riboflavin Ophthalmic Solution without Dextran

Flavin TE

Flavin TE

Trans-epithelial Riboflavin Ophthalmic Solution

Flavin H

Flavin H

Riboflavin Ophthalmic solution with Hypromellose

Bioring

Bioring

Intra Stromal Corneal Ring

Optiject

Optiject

IOL delivery system

Biotech Vision Care Pvt. Ltd. (India)
Eyecryl Phakic

Eyecryl Phakic

Phakic Aspheric Hydrophilic Acrylic Foldable Intraocular Lens

Eyecryl Phakic TORIC

Hydrophilic Acrylic Foldable Phakic Toric Intraocular Lens With Delivery System

Biotech Europe Meditech Inc. Ltd. (Ireland)

No Products Found.

1. What is a refractive error?

Refractive error is a vision condition where the eye fails to properly focus light onto the retina, resulting in blurred vision. It occurs when the shape of the eye or its optical components (cornea, lens) does not bend or refract light correctly, causing images to appear unclear or distorted.

2. What is the medical term refractive mean?

In the medical context, “refractive” refers to the bending or redirection of light rays as they pass through different media, such as the cornea, aqueous humor, lens, and vitreous humor of the eye. Refractive errors occur when the eye’s optical system fails to refract light accurately onto the retina.

3. What is the refraction of the eye?

The refraction of the eye is the process by which the cornea and lens bend (refract) incoming light rays to focus them onto the retina, located at the back of the eye. This process is essential for producing a clear and focused image on the retina, which is then transmitted to the brain for visual perception.

4. What are the types of refractive errors?

The main types of refractive errors are;

  • myopia (nearsightedness): Close objects appear clear, but distant objects appear blurred.
  • Hyperopia (farsightedness): Distant objects appears more clear than close ones.
  • Astigmatism: Blurred or distorted vision at all distances due to irregular curvature of the cornea or lens.
  • Presbyopia: Age-related difficulty in focusing on close objects due to the loss of flexibility of the lens.

5. What are the symptoms of a refractive error?

Symptoms of refractive errors encompass a range of visual disturbances that can significantly impact daily life. These symptoms include blurred vision, affecting clarity at any distance, and difficulty in discerning objects whether up close or far away. Eye strain and fatigue often accompany refractive errors, manifesting as discomfort after prolonged visual tasks. Headaches may also occur due to the constant effort required to focus properly. Individuals may find themselves squinting to see clearly, a reflexive response to improve visual acuity. Additionally, challenges with night driving, such as experiencing halos or glare around lights, are common indicators of refractive errors. Recognizing these symptoms prompts individuals to seek corrective measures such as eyeglasses, contact lenses, or refractive surgery to enhance visual clarity and alleviate discomfort.

6. What causes refractive errors?

Refractive errors stem from diverse factors, encompassing abnormalities in the cornea, lens, or eyeball shape, which can distort light entering the eye. Genetic predisposition also plays a role, influencing the likelihood of developing such conditions. Environmental factors contribute to the onset of refractive errors, alongside age-related changes like presbyopia, which affects near vision as people grow older. Furthermore, eye trauma or injury can induce refractive errors, underscoring the multifaceted nature of their origins.

7. How are refractive errors diagnosed?

Refractive errors are diagnosed through a comprehensive eye examination performed by an optometrist or ophthalmologist. Diagnostic tests may include visual acuity testing, refraction assessment (using a phoropter or autorefractor), measurement of intraocular pressure, evaluation of the eye’s focusing ability, and examination of the eye’s structures and health.

8. How are refractive errors treated?

Refractive errors can be corrected through various methods. Eyeglasses use lenses to bend light rays onto the retina. Contact lenses achieve the same effect. Refractive surgeries like LASIK reshape the cornea permanently. Treatment choice depends on factors such as the type and severity of the error and lifestyle preferences.

1. What does refraction look like?

Refraction is a fundamental optical phenomenon that occurs when light passes from one medium to another, such as from air to the cornea and lens of the eye. While the process of refraction itself is not visible to the naked eye, its effects are observable in how light is bent or focused by the eye’s optical components to form clear images on the retina. Without proper refraction, light rays may converge before or beyond the retina, leading to blurred vision and visual disturbances.

2. What can I expect if I have a refractive error?

If you have a refractive error, your vision may be compromised in various ways depending on the type and severity of the error. Common symptoms include blurred vision, difficulty seeing objects at certain distances, eye strain, headaches, squinting, and visual fatigue. These symptoms can affect daily activities such as reading, driving, and using digital screens. Corrective measures such as eyeglasses, contact lenses, or refractive surgery can help improve visual acuity and alleviate discomfort.

3. What is Refractive Surgery?

Refractive surgery encompasses a range of surgical procedures designed to correct refractive errors in the eye and reduce dependency on eyeglasses or contact lenses. These surgeries are further classified into cornea based procedure & lens based procedures. Cornea based e procedures aim to reshape the cornea or lens to optimize the way light rays are focused onto the retina, thereby improving visual clarity and reducing or eliminating the need for corrective lenses. Phakic Surgeries are most common lens based procedure where IOL is implanted in front of natural lens correct the refraction of optical system. Refractive surgery is typically performed by ophthalmologists specializing in corneal and refractive surgery.

4. Who is right individual for refractive surgery?

Refractive surgery is considered for individuals with refractive errors such as myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), astigmatism (distorted vision), and presbyopia (age-related difficulty in focusing on close objects). Candidates for refractive surgery should have stable vision, good overall eye health, and realistic expectations regarding the outcomes and potential risks of the procedure. Refractive surgery may be a suitable option for those seeking long-term freedom from glasses or contact lenses.

5. Are there Risks of Refractive Surgery?

While refractive surgery is generally safe and effective, it does carry potential risks and complications, as with any surgical procedure. Risks may include dry eyes, glare, halos around lights, fluctuating vision, infection, under- or over-correction of refractive error. However, the overall incidence of complications is low, especially when the surgery is performed by experienced surgeons using advanced techniques and technology.

6. What are the Refractive Surgery Methods?

Refractive surgery methods include LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis), PRK (photorefractive keratectomy), LASEK (laser epithelial keratomileusis), SMILE (small incision lenticule extraction), Refractive Lens Exchange (RLE) and Implantation of Phakic IOLs. Each method utilizes different approaches to reshape the cornea or implanting lens and correct refractive errors. The choice of method depends on factors such as the patient’s refractive error, corneal thickness, and overall eye health, as well as the surgeon’s expertise and preference.

7. When should I have my eyes examined?

It is recommended to undergo regular comprehensive eye examinations, even in the absence of apparent vision problems. Adults should typically have eye exams every one to two years, while individuals with existing eye conditions, risk factors, or a history of refractive surgery may require more frequent evaluations. Regular eye exams allow for the early detection and management of refractive errors, as well as other eye conditions such as glaucoma, cataracts, and macular degeneration, helping to preserve eye health and vision over time.

Eyecryl Phakic

Eyecryl Phakic

Phakic Aspheric Hydrophilic Acrylic Foldable Intraocular Lens

Eyecryl Phakic TORIC

Hydrophilic Acrylic Foldable Phakic Toric Intraocular Lens With Delivery System

Flavin

Flavin

Isotonic Riboflavin Ophthalmic Solution

Flavin HY

Flavin HY

Hypotonic Riboflavin Ophthalmic Solution without Dextran

Flavin TE

Flavin TE

Trans-epithelial Riboflavin Ophthalmic Solution

Flavin H

Flavin H

Riboflavin Ophthalmic solution with Hypromellose

MANUFACTURING FACILITY

Roscommon, Ireland

Unit AF 2, IDA Business & Technology Park, Gallowstown, Co Roscommon, F42 P862,
IRELAND

MANUFACTURING FACILITY

Ahmedabad, India

Plot No. 4, PHARMEZ, SarkhejBavla N.H. 8A. Near Village Matoda, Taluka Sanand, District Ahmedabad, Gujarat – 382213,
India

OFFICE

SWITZERLAND

Battig Treuhand AG Obergrundstrasse 17, 6002,
Luzern, Switzerland

OFFICE

INDIA

Block 1, Abhishree Corporate Park, Opposite Swagat Bunglow, BRTS Stop, Bopal-Ambli Road, Ahmedabad – 380 058, Gujarat, India

OFFICE

TURKEY

Boyaci Koy Yokusu Firin Sok. No. 32
Baltalimani / Istanbul 34467, Turkey

OFFICE

GERMANY

GmbH Hallstadter Str. 75, 96052 Bamberg,
Germany

OFFICE

SPAIN

AV. DE Les Corts Catalanes, Sant Cugat Del Valles, Nº 9-11, Planta 2, Oficina 9D, Spain.

OFFICE

BRAZIL

Av. Queroz Filho 1560 – Vila Leopoldina, Salas 201 e 202, Ed. Gaivota – Condominio Vista Verde Offices,
Sao Paulo, Brazil

OFFICE

COLOMBIA

Sas CALLE 97 No. 61-93, Bogota D.C,
110111, Bogota, Colombia

OFFICE

UK

25 Leeming road, Borehamwood,
England, United Kingdom

OFFICE

MOROCCO

71 Angle Bd Mohamed V Et Rue Azilal Centre D Affaire Contempo Etg 3

OFFICE

EGYPT 

44, Hegas st.,St Heliopolis, Second Floor Apartment 4,
Cairo – Egypt